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Going to do it, once again.... Probibly for the last time

Jozie
Submitted by It'l Dodat on Tue, 09/04/2019 - 18:13
Forums

Well, as you chaps know, by my posts on the facbook page thing, <because I can't seem to load multiple photo's> I've been on a bit of a mission to get the same gear that I had when I started out camping / hiking on my own, some 40 years ago.

This mission's been years and years in the making, I've done some trials at mabalingwe, a few more at Sionsberg, but I was still missing a lot of the key gear...but over the last few months, just like that everything's come together..

So far I have the same hiking stove, (Globetrotter) the same tent, (Backpacker Kestrel III) the same backpack, (backpacker elephant) and on Sunday I'll also have the same sleeping bag. (Backpacker benederm hollowfill 3 seasons)

Together with the sleeping mats, a blow-up pillow from a swimming pool lilo I'm just about there

Now that's quite something.... To have gotten together, all the same stuff that I had, over 40 years ago...

But it's all part of a plan for my next December adventure... Perhaps a bit on the nostalgic end, who cares... but what I really want to do is go dorp-crawling, at the end of my time using the very same gear I had 40 years ago at the start of my time.....

Dorp-crawling... Kinda visit all the towns that are not on the map... Flavour the town, experience it, visit it and use the hiking stuff to backpack round the area and visit the sights and places to see...

At 61, and a wobbly archillies tendon <result of an old motorcycle war-wound> realistically, I don't think there will be much backpacking, but so what?

Putting the old equipment, together with the footloose & fancy free like I used to be......

is what's going to make this an adventure for my memories.....

yujtyj

uiktuik

gbtybjuyu

fvxrf

Oudtshoorn

neef Herman

Thu, 11/04/2019 - 18:54

Warren, I have a Backpacker boulder backpack, but retired because the shoulder strap padding collapsed.  Same camping gas stove, but the small gas canisters seems to be discontinued. Must admit that from being able to hike with 25kg nowadays 18kg is now barely manageable. 

Centurion

Voortrekker

Thu, 11/04/2019 - 20:00

I said to my wife that our boys are now both reaching the right age to start overnight hiking trips, and that we should seriously consider to build up our gear start to do it in the future.   In my opinion it is the best camping experience?

Jozie

It'l Dodat

Fri, 12/04/2019 - 06:07

Warren, I have a Backpacker boulder backpack, but retired because the shoulder strap padding collapsed.  Same camping gas stove, but the small gas canisters seems to be discontinued. Must admit that from being able to hike with 25kg nowadays 18kg is now barely manageable. 

Morning Neef..

Interesting that you and I both had similar equipment, at what I imagine to be, about the same time... When I started out I also had the 75L Boulder... Funny thing is that when I bought all that stuff, I looked at all three stoves, the Trangia the Optimus and the Globe trotter. I only plumbed for the Globetrotter because the sales guy (who actually knew what he was about) convinced me to go that route.... For the most part he was right...

BTW, the Globtrotter burner is the best burner to have because the lip round the flame is infact a windshield, which none of the next generation's have, including the modern "spider" type that's not cannister top generic....  Yip... That salesman he knew his oats from his chaff... Unlike the teenage sales assistants you get these days.... As my Jewish bobba would say....

"They know from nothing"...... < Roughly interpreted "You don't know, what you don't know".... Quite clever / cutting / sarcastic...

Anyhow... Enough about my mythical Jewish Bobba... Who had what a whole heap of what is called in Yiddish... Uncommon common...

Now I have all three... many thanks for that... What's missing with the Gaz is that something special about cooking on a "roarer" / solid fuel stove that brings an atmosphere that gas just can't replicate..... And that's  what the salesman at Camp & Climb in Braamfontein, who guided me in getting the right stuff back in the late 70's, did not appreciate... Not to worry, I'm only "getting" that "something" now...

Funny how things work.... ( And this goes out to Anton as well)

When the flush of youth is long since gone and I'm just about in the grave....  Now I find out what's important..... DON'T MISS THE BOAT.... DON'T LET YOUR KIDS MISS THE BOAT.

Yes the smaller cannisters are obsolete, but one can make a "filler" attachement by canabilising the connecting pipe & fitting from one of those hiking stoves that has the pipe & screw on attachment.

You modify the stove end of the pipe, screw out the jet on the Globetrotter and screw in the modified pipe... <you leave the stove clipped onto the cannister> and open the valve and the pressure equalises, thus filling the cannister, and you just re-use the same cannister.

I'm looking to modify the clips and make them a bit longer to suit the next cannister size up, and an aliminium tube to go inside the Globetrotter's container so that the two containers will close over the open ends of the tube... A kind of extention if you will.

Yes, I agree, carrying weight these days is a hell of a lot more difficult... To get around that I came up with the concept of removably strapping my Boulder to a golf cart, so that for the most part, I can cart the weight, an only have to carry it when the terrein is to rough for the cart. I can also remove the backpack from the cart completely and deploy it as a "true" backpack - see pic -

The cart is truly not much in the way of weight, and I'm 100 % happy to sacrifice the litte extra weight for the convienience of being able to catr the weight.. As you can see when the cart is collapsed down it's near as dammit is to swearing the same physical size as the backpack..

HI Anton,

Yes there is something about being totally self sufficient, and just managing with what you yourself have at hand, overcomming the challanges of distance / weather and nature, that makes hiking and tent camping just so much more satisfying......... More fundamental........ More of an adventure if you will, than what we do in caravans / campers and all of that with all the amenities and nonsense we take with because our cars can....

But I guess, that point of view is too hard a pill for a lot of "campers" to swallow....

I'm really looking forward to "replicating" my adventures of way back then....

Some pics.....

75L backpacker backpack, kitted for 72H configured to "tote"or "carry"

rfrf

 

Same backpack configured to "cart" I still have not resolved the problem of "torque"force because I'm pulling it with one arm, I've got a very broad belt somewhere......... When I find it, I'm thinking to attach the handle to it so that I can pull it behind me...

sfr4f34

 

This is the type of hiking stove to modify to fill the small cannisters

cygtrg

 

My current hiking set up... Don't get better than this... It's just something that no caravan can replicate....

tgdgtyg4

 

 

 

 

Oudtshoorn

neef Herman

Fri, 12/04/2019 - 07:00

Morning Warren, I have another stove, same model that takes the next size gas canister, that is a little too long for the container, but still gets packed into it. 

Matrass is one of the self inflating ones, and is a 100% improvement on the old foam matrass, folds into a tiny bagg.  The old matrass I still have, but reduced in size as the high density foam is a good gasket material.smiley

Sleeping bag also modern, weight about 1, 5kg and good for below freezing. The old sleeping bag still around, gets used when grandchildren camp here on the farm.

Tent also light weight with good ventilation and mosquito proofing. Ja jong  all the kitt is still here,  packed in ammo box, even the survival blanket, rain poncho, putties,  water purefication tabs, esbit stove and fuel, fire starter kit, pencil flare. One item that I never liked was this Spork business.

I have a plan to hike the fish river again,10 times if the body holds out, but need to sort out a knee with some gravel in it.

 

Oudtshoorn

neef Herman

Fri, 12/04/2019 - 07:08

Voorie, daar is geen beter kamp ondervinding as rugsak stap nie, nooit nie.

Ons  het ons dogters van kleins af laat saamstap, natuurlik net sulke kort stappies langs n stroompie. Later dagstappe gedoen, en hier by 12 jaar het hulle sak gedra. Ons het die Outenqua gestap met een dogter toe sy so 12 was, magties sy was taf vir n ballerina,  die was haar passie, en het nie ander sport gedoen nie.

Centurion

Voortrekker

Fri, 12/04/2019 - 07:24

My eerste  rugsak wat ek vir myself gekoop het was 'n Jaguar C85  Karrimor in 1993.    85L reg vir die lang staptogte (week of langer)    My sak gewig was gewoonlik so 17 kg met kos ingesluit.   Natuurlik hoe langer jy stap hoe ligter word hy soos mens eet. smiley  As daai sak hier by die 12 kg kom dan stap 'n mens darem lekker.

Jozie

It'l Dodat

Fri, 12/04/2019 - 09:51

  Morning Warren, I have another stove, same model that takes the next size gas canister, that is a little too long for the container, but still gets packed into it. 

Yes I have one as well, but as I said, the Globetrotter burner has the windshield, and the later one just has the 4 wire stands that swivel round. 

I have an old second Globetrotter, the billies are bashed, and no wire handle, so what I did was change the Globetrotter's burner with the wire one, and that why I want a thin piece of alliminium sheet shaped round into an open ended tube so that it fits into the billy, and is long enough to work with the longer cannister....

It can then also work as a weather shield by drilling 4 x 4mm holes right through the "tube" at 90 deg, to each other at one end then passing 2 x 4mm pieces of aliminium wire, cut so as to fit longways inside the tube when it's all packed together.

When using the weather shield The wire will stick out in 4 directions and act as the feet / stabiliser / laat hy nie so maklik oorval nie

hahaha You and me... You have sand in your knee & I have an Archillies tendon that's all wobbly & wonkey... Think we should do the Fish together? .... Jy bring jou kierrie en ek bring my walker....

Tip van die dag:  Die van julle wat so stap en wil nie te swaar dra nie, onthou om die ligte goedjies in te pak soos castle light.  Dit is blykbaar nie so swaar soos bv castle stout nie..

Die laaste wat ek naastenby so iets gedra het soos 'n rugsak, was in die army...

Voorrie, lus vir wat?????

Oudtshoorn

neef Herman

Fri, 12/04/2019 - 13:24

Voorie, daai swaar dra in die begin was altyd drank en vleis. Vacuum verpakte steaks hou n paar dae, 6 biere vir die eerste aand, wiskey, die word in plastiek hoesgoedbotteltjies gegooi, 200ml per dag. So 2l papsak rooiwyn ook nog. Darem altyd gedeel, alhoewel baie suinig met die wat eerder met n ligte sak stap. En dan die 1l wynsak, 750ml Old Brown, en 250ml Captain Morgan, die heerlikste opkikker deur die dag as die sweet loop.

Nou verlang ek bitter erg.

Secunda

Sleep nou

Fri, 12/04/2019 - 18:57

Ek is ook baie lief vir stap my army rugsak soek ek terug gewerk soos n bom ek gehoor erens in Pretoria kry jy nog die weermag goed